EAA Guidelines for authors

Articles for EAA should be typed with 2.0 word processor spacing. The name(s) and address(es) and e-mail address(es) of the author(s) should be included, as well as an abstract of up to 200 words and up to six keywords. Pages should be numbered.

Line drawings must be of publication quality, in black ink on white paper or drawing film, to fit within a frame 168 x 230 mm maximum (excluding caption). Drawing should be reduced to this size before sending. Drafting (e.g. line width, typography) should take account additional reduction, if necessary, and computer-generated drawings involving shading should be provided at a size not requiring reduction. Line drawings may also be submitted digitized in jpeg or gif format, attached to an e-mail document on sent on floppy disk. The same criteria as above applies to digitized drawings.

Captions for figures and tables should be supplied on a separate sheet of paper, or as a separate digitized file. Labelling on figures should be in a publishable form. Good quality black and white (or half-tone) photographs can be accommodated. Footnotes should be sent as a separate file in the event that during electronic transmission they are "lost."

If possible, a hard copy and a 3.5" disk version (preferrably in Word for Windows, though Word, Macintosh Word, WordPerfect and, if absolutely necessary, txt or rtf files can be accommodated) of contributions must be submitted to the address listed below. Upon receipt of the paper, acknowledgement will be sent. Authors will subsequently be contacted if there are question on the text or illustrations. When possible, text proofs of papers will be provided and these should be returned within one week of receipt. Where it is not possible to send text proofs by mail they will either be faxed or sent as an e-mail attachment. Any changes or corrections should be returned to the address below within one week after receipt of the proofs.

Authorities must be given to Latin names, either at their first mention or in a comprehensive list, and species lists should follow a named checklist. Taxonomic names above genus should not be italicised. In the text, references should be indicated by the author's name and the year of publication (with page numbers where necessary), as follows: Percival (1921, 178) or (Hall and Kenward 1980; Paap 1984). References in Slavic languages should be tranliterated into Latin letters, with the tranliteration following the original language. References should follow the 'modified Harvard' convention and should be listed in alphabetical order (with journal titles in full) at the end of the paper, as below:

Ambers, J. 1994. Stable carbon isotope values for Tofts Ness, pp. 125-8 in Luff, R. and Rowley-Conwy, P. (eds.), Whither Environmental Archaeology? Oxford: Oxbow Books.

Amorosi, T. 1996. Icelandic Zooarchaeology: New Data applied to Issues of Historical Ecology. Unpublished Ph.D. thesis, City University of New York.

Greig, J. 1990. Plant and parasite remains from 16th century pits, pp. 139-49 in Burrows, I. (ed.), Excavations at 5-8 Fore St., Taunton, 1979.

Proceedings of the Somerset Archaeological and Natural History Society 132, 95-164.

Hall, A. R. and Kenward, H. K. 1980. An interpretation of biological remains from Highgate, Beverley. Journal of Archaeological Science 7, 33-51.

Rackham, O. 1990. Trees and Woodland in the British Landscape (revised edition). London: Dent.

Where three or more authors are involved, use Davies et al. in the text but all of the authors' names in the list of references.

Style Sheet for References

Book

Fenton, A. 1978. The Northern Isles: Orkney and Shetland. Edinburgh: John Donald.

Rackham, O. 1990. Trees and Woodland in the British Landscape (revised edition). London: Dent.

Thirsk, J. (ed.) 1985. The Agrarian History of England and Wales 5(2). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Duby, G. 1968. Rural Economy and Country Life in the Medieval West (translated from 1962 French edition by C. Postan). London: Edward Arnold.

Cobbett, W. 1979. Cottage Economy (reprint of 1850 edition). Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Journal article

Ezzo, J. A. 1992. A test of diet versus diagenesis at Ventana Cave, Arizona. Journal of Archaeological Science 19, 23-7.

Hillman G. C. 1984. Traditional husbandry and processing of archaic cereals in recent times, 1: the glume wheats. Bulletin on Sumerian Agriculture 1, 114-52.

Campbell, B. 1983. Agricultural progress in medieval England: some evidence from east Norfolk. Economic History Review (2nd. series) 36, 26-46.

Paper in edited volume

Ambers, J. 1994. Stable carbon isotope values for Tofts Ness, pp. 125-8 in Luff, R. and Rowley-Conwy, P. (eds.), Whither Environmental Archaeology? Oxford: Oxbow Books.

Book series

Schiffer, M. B. (ed.) 1986. Advances in Archaeological Method and Theory 9. Orlando: Academic Press.

Hall, A. R. and Kenward, H. K. 1990. Environmental Evidence from the Colonia (The Archaeology of York 14, 6). London: Council for British Archaeology.

Robinson, D. and Rasmussen, P. 1989. Botanical investigations at the neolithic lake village at Weier, north east Switzerland: leaf hay and cereals as animal fodder, pp. 149-63 in Milles, A., Williams, D. and Gardner, N. (eds.), The Beginnings of Agriculture (BAR International Series 496). Oxford: British Archaeological Reports.

Cherry, J. F. 1988. Pastoralism and the role of animals in the pre- and proto-historic economies of the Aegean, pp. 6-34 in Whittaker, C. R. (ed.), Pastoral Economies in Classical Antiquity (Supplementary Volume 14). Cambridge: Cambridge Philological Society.

Book in journal

Salvi, G. 1982. La scalvatura della cerreta nell' alta valle del Trebbia. Note dalle fonti orali, in Moreno, D., Piussi, P. and Rackham, O. (eds.), Boschi: Storia e Archeologia. Quaderni Storici 49, 148-56.

Specialist report in site report

Greig, J. 1990. Plant and parasite remains from 16th century pits, pp. 139-49 in Burrows, I. (ed.), Excavations at 5-8 Fore St., Taunton, 1979. Proceedings of the Somerset Archaeological and Natural History Society 132, 95-164.

Thesis

Amorosi, T. 1996. Icelandic Zooarchaeology: New Data applied to Issues of Historical Ecology. Unpublished Ph.D. thesis, City University of New York.

Unpublished report

Hall, A. R., Kenward, H. K. and Robertson, A. 1993c. Investigation of medieval and post-medieval plant and invertebrate remains from Area II of the excavations in The Bedern (north-east), York (YAT/Yorkshire Museum sitecode 1976-81.14 II). Unpublished Ancient Monuments Laboratory Report 58/93.

Buckland, P. 1995. St George's School, Margaret Street, Walmgate, York. The insect remains (appendix), in Foster, P. and Symonds, J., An archaeological evaluation at St George's School, Margaret Street, Walmgate, York. Unpublished ARCUS report 208, University of Sheffield.

Author(s) + other contributor(s)

Brochier, J. E., Villa, P. and Giacomarra, M. with an appendix by Tagliacozza, A. 1992. Shepherds and sediments: geo-ethnoarchaeology of pastoral sites. Journal of Anthropological Archaeology 11, 47-102.

Latin binomials in title

van Valkenburgh, B., Teaford, M. F. and Walker, A. 1990. Molar microwear and diet in large carnivores : inferences concerning diet in the sabre-toothed cat, Smilodon fatalis. Journal of Zoology 222, 319-40.

Mainland, I. L. 1994. An Evaluation of the Potential of Dental Microwear Analysis for Reconstructing the Diet of Domesticated Sheep (Ovis aries) and Goats (Capra hircus) within an Archaeological Context. Unpublished Ph.D. thesis, University of Sheffield.

Slavic transliteration

Yablonsky, L.T. 1986. Unikal'nii obrazets zverinovo stilya iz drevnevo kurgana v Severnoi Turkmenii//Panorama iskusstv, 8 ("An Unique Example of Animal Style from an Ancient Kurgan in Northern Turkmenia." Panorama of Art 8).

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Send papers and all correspondence to:

 

Dr. Jeannine Davis-Kimball
Center for the Study of Eurasian Nomads
1607 Walnut Street
Berkeley, CA 94709 USA
e-mail: jkimball@csen.org
tele: 510- 549-3708
fax: 510 849-3137